This isn’t just your ordinary, run-of-the-mill pies.  It’s a deep-dish, creamy treat that everyone, including pumpkin-haters, will enjoy!  Use your favourite pastry recipe.  To me, the less pastry the better, so I just use a basic recipe and roll it paper-thin.

You will need:

 

First things first, preheat your oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit (230 degrees Celsius)

In a large bowl, preferably a chilled, metal or glass one, add a ½ cup of milk, ½ teaspoon of vanilla, and your pouch of powdered whip cream.  Beat on high until the mixture actually begins to look like whipped cream, but just barely!  If you over-beat now, you’ll make your pie all yucky!

In a separate bowl, add your eggs and white sugar.  Whisk manually until the mixture is nice and fluffy.  Add the salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, ground cloves, and ginger to the mix, then give it a gentle stir until the spices have been absorbed into the liquid.

While gently stirring with your whisk, add cream to the egg mixture, followed by the flour.  Don’t add all of the flour at once.  It will clump!  Sprinkle it in slowly.

(Optional!  Once the flour has been added, pour the egg mixture into a jar, seal it tight, and give it a really good shake before letting it cool in the fridge for an hour.  If you choose to do this, make sure to chill your second bowl, too!)

With your whipped cream mixture, dump in the pumpkin puree and brown sugar, and then give it a stir until the whipped cream is one with the pumpkin.  Now add 2 cups of milk and grab your electric mixer.  Mix on high until everything looks nice and creamy.

Retrieve your egg mixture and switch your mixer to medium speed.  While mixing, pour the egg mixture in slowly.  Blend together until, well, it’s blended together.  This usually takes about five minutes.

Once you’re done, pour the filling on top of your pie crust and place in the oven for fifteen minutes at 450 degrees Fahrenheit (230 degrees Celsius), and then reduce heat to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (175 degrees Celsius) for about an hour.

Published November 1, 2011

Leave a Reply

Marked fields are required: *