Jarred Mincemeat image

(transcribed directly from her handwritten notes, circa 1890)

MINCEMEAT

 

Pack in jars and keep in a cool place.

Method

The fruit should all be chopped or ground rather coarse. The candied peel tends to be hard if left in chunks.

The suet makes a mess of the meat grinder and it is better to get it already ground from the butcher.

Mix all the spice in the sugar so that it does not gather in little lumps when it gets damp.

There is no mixing implement more effective than the hand.

If you have a cold place to keep this, it may be left in a large covered bowl or pot. The liquid tends to collect on top and has to be stirred in. It does not freeze.

Ingredients

If you can get sour cooking apples, they are much better than the usual insipid Macintosh. I wash and quarter them, removing stem and core, and then use peel and all. Put a dish or something on the floor [under the grinder] for they drip, but the juice thus saved can be put back into the mixture, of course.

Mixed peel is just as good as citron alone.

The recipe calls for twice as much sugar, but this is determined by the apples.

Beef shank and the other cheap cuts of beef are a waste unless you allow a great deal extra for all the sinew and gristle you cannot use; a potroast cut serves best, and the resulting broth makes wonderful stock, of course. Get 2½ lb. of this and let it cool in the broth. One of my books recommends beef heart, but you would have to remove every vestige of fat, of course.

A whole quart of any liquid would make a sloppy mixture. Start with two cups. I use a bit of lemon juice or unsweetened grape juice if you can get it, because I have never had the madeira, and brandy according to who was going to eat the mincemeat.

Published December 1, 2011

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